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Archive For: Contenders

Iris Folding — A Fun and Easy Paper Folding Technique

Iris folding is a fun and easy paper folding technique that originated in Holland.  It’s an excellent way to use paper scraps, used envelopes, left over wrapping paper, etc.  The texture and depth of the card or scrapbook page you create are just amazing!  You start with a simple pattern; many basic templates are available for free online.  Iris folding is the layering of folded strips of colored paper (or even wide ribbon is neat) in a spiral pattern that resembles the iris of a camera.

Iris folding is similar to paint-by-number, except that you are using folded strips of paper instead of paint.  If you are using thin paper, it must be folded in half to create depth or if you are using cardstock, you do not need to fold the strips.  When creating our cards we worked from the back of our cardstock.  We traced our pattern in the center with a pencil.  It is very helpful to laminate your pattern so you can use it over and over again without it ripping or tape sticking to it.  Next, cut your design out creating an opening in the middle of the card.  Tape your pattern to your work surface and then lay your cardstock over your pattern making sure you are still working from the back.

The lines on your pattern indicate where the strips of paper will be placed.  Always keep the folded edges of the paper strips toward the center of your design.  Tape #1 strip using the specified color, then onto #2. It is important to layer in sequential order or your design will not flow.  I found it very helpful to mark my pattern with highlighters to distinguish the colors I would be using instead of always having to refer back to the color chart.  So if my pattern read:
A: 1,5,9,13
B: 2,6,10,14
C: 3,7,11,15
D: 4,8,12,16,
I would take 4 different color highlighters, one for each letter, and then highlight the numbers.  It is a real time saver.  When taping your pieces always be sure you are taping to your cardstock or other strips of paper.  Never tape anything to your pattern or work surface.  You will be very disappointed at the end if this happens.  Use little pieces of tape.  As you add new strips you may trim as you go along or at the end.  Continue in sequential order until you reach the middle and then turn your cardstock over.  Your masterpiece!!!  The results are quite impressive!  Tape another piece of cardstock to the back where you were working so no one can see the mess.

Since we were teaching approximately a dozen girls I tried to be organized.  Each girl was assigned a brown gift/shopping bag with their name written on an address label and attached to the handle.  Inside of the bag every member had their own roll of tape with their name on it as well.  We had downloaded a dozen free pattern templates and stapled them together into booklets for each member to use at the meeting as well as to keep to enjoy at home.  After a brief introduction and demonstration, the girls were able to choose from several projects.  We had displayed several card project ideas with a small clothesline.    Their gift bag now became an iris folded project as well.  They could put any cards they created into their bag for safe keeping.

Jody Sanger, Pennsylvania

 

Chalk Drawing What a Blessed Skill to Learn!

Our club joined professional artist Elva Hurst for a “chalk talk” in her barnyard studio located locally.  Our senses were engaged through music, storytelling, and Elva’s amazing chalk artistry.  She has professionally pre-recorded a selection of inspirational messages that you may choose.  Then she illustrates the story right before your eyes.  Her website is www.elvaschalkart.com.  The club paid for the chalk talk but asked each member to supply the additional fee for a chalk lesson afterward.

Jody Sanger, Pennsylvania

 

Archery

The 20 Legacy teens recently earned the Archery badge.  Safety and bow and arrow parts were introduced before the Archers nocked their first arrow.  All the teens tried out the various recurve and long bows aiming at paper targets on hay bales. Everyone’s shooting improved each week!  We learned the importance of grip, stance, a full draw, the anchor, release and follow through.  Best of all, we exposed the teens to a unique and fun sport they were enthusiastic to try—many for the first time!

Cheryl Chew, Florida

 

Pottery, A Good Experience

Today we had our monthly Keepers at Home meeting and we focused on getting our pottery award.  My friend who does her own pottery taught us the different styles and techniques in pottery making.  I knew she was an excellent teacher, Mookie and Bubby loved her art class at our homeschool coop, but this was my first time seeing first hand how amazing she is!

She had the girls make a pinch pot, a coiled pot and then showed them how to throw a pot on a potter’s wheel.  Some even jumped in, got super messy and tried their hands at the wheel too!

Mookie was in her element with creating the pottery.  She enjoyed both styles she tried, but really took her time with the coiled pot.  She’s a little regretful she didn’t dive in and try the potter’s wheel—she’s never been into messy things—but maybe we’ll have another chance sometime.

Wendi Bevitt, Kansas

 

Grilling

Having fun grilling

Having fun grilling

Three sessions were taught to the high school Contenders guys (4).  The sessions included safety, clean and attractive food prep and presentation.  Burgers, chicken, pork/kabobs were grilled.  Putting together a burger bar, marinade for the kabobs, and side dishes appropriate for the various meals were also incorporated.  We also made veggie and dessert on the propane grill.

Our group had a Game Night and the guys grilled hamburgers for the group on a Weber grill with charcoal.  We also went camping and the guys grilled hamburgers for everyone in a camping pit with charcoal.  They greatly enjoyed getting the fire ready, watching them cook, and savoring the flavor when the burgers were ready to eat.  They liked grilling for everyone and hearing the praise and affirmation that accompanied a job well doneJ

The notable difference between teaching the boys vs. teaching the same thing to the girls separately was the amount eaten.  The boys happily consumed two – three times the amount of the girls!

Cheryl Chew, Florida

 

Outdoor Life & Pocketknife

How fun!

How fun!

We combined two badges together with our Keepers Club, meeting at the house of one of our club members rather than the usual village hall so we could light a fire.

Beforehand, everyone had to look at some preparatory materials such as a knife safety pamphlet, listen to advice on what to do if lost, learning what essential gear for day-hikes is, and lessons on using a compass.  On the day, we set up three stations, and separated the club into three age groups.  One group started with the pocketknife requirements of finding wood, whittling, sharpening, etc. (see photo)

Another group practiced their compass skills, and the third group discussed what to pack for a day hike by sifting through a lot of clothes and equipment (including snorkels, flippers, and other such silly items) and putting appropriate items into a backpack.

After everyone had a chance to rotate through all three stations, the group went to gather firewood.  Once they had made a large pile, the three groups separated again to go on age-appropriate treasure hunts, using their compasses to find provisions for a marshmallow roast.

Fire-building was demonstrated and everyone toasted marshmallows, most of them using their whittled sticks from the pocketknife portion of the badge work.

In the weeks that followed, two walks were organised: one took the children along footpaths for two miles to a chicken farm, from which they had to find their own way back.  Interestingly, they learned an additional lesson about keeping an eye on the stragglers so no one got lost.  The second walk required a map and using a compass, and even though it was a 2-plus-mile circular walk, a two-year-old managed to do it as well.

Kat Patrick
Oxfordshire Keepers of the Faith Club
England

Roasting marshmallows. Yummy!

Roasting marshmallows. Yummy!

Learning to whittle.

Learning to whittle.

 

Diorama

It turned out so well.

It turned out so well.

The skill of diorama teaches so many things: planning a project, gathering supplies, scaling to size, attractiveness of picture, and more.  The following club did a great job teaching this skill to their girls.

Kimberly organized all the materials each girl would need.  These included, paints, paper, colored paper, scissors, glues, paint brushes and tape.  Every Keeper was required to bring a shoe box to make the diorama.

Kimberly discussed miniatures and how they are used.  We also also considered different kinds of themes that the girls could pick from such as seasons, etc.. to use in the diorama.

She taught the girls what “to scale” means and how it is important in planning, especially when making things in miniature.  Planning ratio between life size and miniature to look realistic was encouraged.  Depth was also considered.

We went outside for a nature walk around the house collecting items for the dioramas.

The girl’s had a lot of fun planning and creating.

Christina Brown, North Carolina

Working Hard

Working Hard

Being Creative

Being Creative

Nice!

Nice!

So Pleased!

So Pleased!

 

Table Tennis – A Good Fellowship Time

I had a lot of fun sharing my past table tennis experience with our Keepers of the Faith kids.  We learned some facts about the game.

Having fun!

Having fun!

For example: Table Tennis is the most popular racquet sport in the world in terms of numbers who play. It is an extremely aerobic sport, requiring a surprisingly high degree of athleticism. There are professional table tennis players who make lots of money. Top athletes in Europe and Asia in particular earn good salaries, tournament prize money, endorsements, etc. Table tennis is a full Olympic sport. Table Tennis has a fairly strong but not so visible following here in the US.  There is a culture of “ping pong” here in the US, which does not do justice to the sport of table tennis.

We learned a few basic strokes, mostly focusing on forehand and backhand topspin drives in the limited time we had.  We learned the proper, legal way to execute a table tennis serve.  We learned the correct rules.  Most were unaware that a table tennis game is no longer 21 points, but 11.  So while there was a lot of  basic “instruction”, we had a lot of fun playing games and challenging each other.  Both sessions I taught proved to be a good fellowship and bonding time.  This skill was taught to the 6 – 10th grade girls.  And later taught to the 6 – 10th grade boys.

Cheryl Chew

 

 

Personal Safety

Demo

Demo

Officer Sam, a club member’s dad, educated the club on safety issues including fire, internet, and police.  He began with a few short informative videos he had downloaded from the internet.  Then he had a local policeman bring his car over and show us what’s inside.  He even ran his siren and lights.  Officer Sam showed us his police bike that he uses to get into congested areas.  It was very interesting to learn about the 30 pounds of gear he wears as part  of his uniform including the taser!  He did  DUI demonstrations using several club members as volunteers.  Between 11:00pm and 3:00am 70% of all drivers have been influenced by alcohol.  In conclusion, he reminded us that safety is from the Lord and read Ephesians 6:10-18.  It is an awesome sight to see a police officer holding a Bible.  Then for a snack, Dunkin’ Donuts’ were served.  After all, what’s a cop without a doughnut?

Jody Sanger

This was an outstanding lesson for the club to learn.  We do have a Fire Safety or Self-Defense award that could be used for this skill.  However, we at Keepers think that we will add a new award called Personal Safety.  We can think of some great requirements for a Personal Safety Skill, but we are also interested in what you the reader might include in such a skill.  If you have ideas, please post below, or send them to us at sales@keepersofthefaith.com.

Officer's Bike

Officer's Bike

Reading God's Word.

Reading God's Word.

Enjoying Donuts!

Enjoying Donuts!

 

Butterflies

Butterfly Exhibit

Butterfly Exhibit

Our 11-year-old daughter Abigail has been earning Keepers pins for about 3-4 years.  Already she has earned 23 pins!  We’re excited about Keepers and the beautiful way this program helps our daughter develop the skills and talents she needs to have a well-rounded life as a daughter of the King.  I appreciate the wide variety of pins to earn; this has helped me to take a balanced approach to teaching Abigail important life skills, as well as developing interests and hobbies that can bring such joy to life.

One of her nature pins was inspired by the chance we had a year or so ago to visit a traveling butterfly exhibit here in our city in east Asia.  The exhibit not only had some live butterflies, but also a large collection of framed butterflies from around the world.  Abigail wanted us to purchase for her one of the small framed collections, which had five butterflies in it.

Her excitement about this, and her desire to learn more about these five butterflies led her to look these butterflies up on the internet.  At that point, I realized that this new interest could easily be guided by the requirements for the butterfly pin.  Abigail found a book on butterflies, which helped her answer the general questions in the Keepers handbook.   Instead of looking up butterflies in our area (as suggested in the handbook), she used the information she gained from researching the five butterflies in her framed collection.

Abigail then used the information to make a lapbook on butterflies.  She was able to share the framed collection and her lapbook at a small “show-and-tell” activity we had with a few other foreign families.

I love how the Keepers pins help us to organize and solidify learning.  Not only does Abigail have her lapbook and her collection, but she also has a Keepers pin as a reward for her hard work in learning more about God’s beautiful creation.

I’ve included a photo of Abigail at the butterfly exhibit, and showing her lapbook to her friends at “show-and-tell.”

Sincerely,
Amy Seifer

 

Show and Tell

Show and Tell